We love our members! In fact, we love them so much that we want you to get to know them, too. After all, this is a community. Every month, the French Cultural Center will introduce you to a member via our blog. This month we are featuring Dr. Karl Brommer, an active Center member and student. Read on to learn more about Karl...

Interested in being featured? Let us know! Interested in being a member and all the fun perks that come with membership? We would love to have you! Contact Membership Manager Natalie Collet at or call 617-912-0400.

Dr. Karl Brommer Dr. Karl Brommer

What is your French/francophone connection?

Our family regularly visits France and Québec and I occasionally work for French companies. I began learning French in junior high school and especially liked French music, movies and paintings. Later, I started reading French novels and listening at night to AM radio from Montréal, especially the hockey games. While raising our family in New Hampshire, we would drive to nearby Québec for francophone books and skiing.

Why did you become a member of the French Cultural Center?

The classes and events are interesting and fun. You meet new people and you can immerse yourself in a French environment. You learn about food, wine, movies, books and art. The center experiments with many different kinds of events. For example, we once had French yoga classes with jazzy music.

How long have you been a member here?

Ten years.

What do you like about membership? What has been your favorite experience?

I like the teachers, the staff, our classmates, the ambiance, the library, the classes, the events, the opportunity to learn about a different way of living and the feeling of taking a mini-vacation from everyday English-language life. For example, we have studied short films, watching new directors and actors in films that would be hard to find elsewhere. We watched a 18-minute film called Au Sol starring Stéphanie Caillol that is probably my all-time favorite film about human kindness. I also especially like the holiday parties, guest speakers and how the Center offers activities for all kinds of people, even tiny babies sitting on their parents' laps!

If you could travel to any francophone country, where you go and why?

I would return to France. While we usually visit Paris, Bordeaux or Provence, I would like to visit Bretagne, the Vendée region, and the Loire Valley, having studied with teachers from these areas in western France. We like the people, the food, the castles and towns, the scenery and the art.

And finally: croissant ou pain au chocolat?

Pain au chocolat

Natalie Collet

Membership Manager

From the Midwest, Natalie is a Francophile at heart. Her interest in French started when studying ballet and​ the language and culture entranced her through her student years.​ She became involved with the - Alliance - in the suburbs of Chicago after she spent an unforgettable year teaching English in a French high school near Bordeaux. She is happy to join the team in Boston and work with the members to provide them with unique opportunities​, ​quality programming​, and a community through French!

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Upcoming Events

Wednesday, January 24, 2018 2:00 PM To 3:30 PM

Join Benjamin for an in-depth discussion of L’exposition coloniale by Érik Orsenna.

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Opening

May '68 Revisited

Special Series Opening

Thursday, February 1, 2018 6:30 PM To 9:00 PM

The French Cultural Center will host a reception to inaugurate the winter/spring series of May ’68 events. Our partners from Harvard and Northeastern universities will be on hand to highlight their activities, events and why they believe the seminal events of 50 years ago remain crucial to examine today.

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Exhibition

May '68: When Paris Erupted in Protest

Exhibition of photos by Marc Riboud

From Feb 2, 2018 To Feb 28, 2018

On May 3, 1968, Parisian students took to the street in protests that spread throughout France, quickly engulfing offices, factories and other places of work. This exhibition of works by the late French photographer Marc Riboud reminds us of both the passions of the moment and of the enigmatic playfulness that striking students and workers frequently displayed.

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